Love Is Not a Permanent State of Enthusiasm

 

Preamble, Mike Wilkins (1987)

  • We must, of course, begin with RIP 2018 (by Pete Reynolds).
  • Consider the new stories we could tell if we decided that instead of fantasizing about killing our monsters, it would be worthwhile to imagine safe places for them in the fictional worlds they inhabit. Imagine seeing big summer movies where mummies are summoned not by a curse, but by a request from a dashing anthropologist to accurately place ancient artifacts in their appropriate human epoch. How would our stories about monsters change, and what would we learn? “There’s a Little Godzilla in All of Us” by Harmony Cox
  • Who told us self-sufficiency was a virtue and why did we believe them? Especially when the truth is obvious, or at least has become very obvious to me over the course of this year, as I’ve eked out a meager space for myself writing the preferred advice column of depressed socialists: we need each other desperately, in ways none of us can be ready for. “AAFU: I’m still in therapy. Should I be dating?” by Brandy Jensen
  • We come from a model where relationships were very clear. The community gave you your sense of identity. You had a lot of certainty, a lot of belonging, zero freedom. And we have urbanized, and we have moved, and we have taken on radical individualism and aspirational materialism, and [now] rules have been replaced by choices. We have massive uncertainty and massive self-doubt. Every second book about relationships these days is about belonging and loneliness. And so everything is a freakin’ negotiation! You negotiate with your partner about what matters, where you want to live, if you want to have children… “Love Is Not a Permanent State of Enthusiasm: An Interview with Esther Perel” by Alexandra Schwartz

 

BOOKSTORES (a whole section!)

 

Something something politics something

 

I SPENT $17 ON A MOVIE TICKET SATURDAY BUT I’D DO IT ANY DAY FOR BARRY JENKINS

(l to r.) Teyonah Parris as Ernestine, KiKi Layne as Tish, and Regina King as Sharon star in Barry Jenkins' IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK, an Annapurna Pictures release.

 

HOW DOES THAT WORK?

 

REALLY NICE WRITING THAT I ENJOYED

 

ALL OF THE -ISMS (NATIONAL, SOCIAL, CAPITAL, JOURNAL)

  • “As far as quasi-religious national obsessions go for large portions of a country’s population, the German aversion to speed limits on the autobahn is up there with gun control in America and whaling in Japan.” Similar too to Hell’s Angels—when a law requiring motorcycle helmets was proposed in 1973, HA and other motorcyclists protested so vehemently that the motion was abandoned.  “Impose a Speed Limit on the Autobahn? Not So Fast, Many Germans Say” by Katrin Bennhold
  • If journalists really believe that what they do is a public good, they should make sure that it is accessible to as many people as possible, not just those who can afford subscriptions to a half-dozen newspapers. It’s understandable, under capitalism, to believe that consumers’ money is what gives your work value. But when we produce investigations into public corruption, etc., we should want our work to have the widest audience possible. And that includes people without extra disposable income to toss at paywalls. “Journalism should be free” by Mari Cohen and Christian Belanger
  • Woof, just let Alex destroy any type of value you may believe capitalism has left for us: today, items of lesser quality are more expensive and therefore we are more sad! Really, just read it. “Consolation Prizes” by Alex Pareene

 

CONCLUDING WITH LOVE

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